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languagesarerad:

-source: Sinosplice 
modal verbs (and their overlaps) expressing can/able to/permitted in Chinese explored via Euler Diagram on Sinosplice.com. 
A = ability in the sense of “know how to” (“会” is more common than “能“)
B = permission/request (use “能” or “可以“)
C = possibility (use “能” or “可以“)
D = permission not granted (use “不可以“)
E = impossibility (use “不能“)
japaneseaesthetics:

Two Gallinules and Lotus Leaves in Shallow Water in the Rain.  Woodblock print, 20th century, Japan, by artist Soseki. 
Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of C. Adrian Rübel
, 1978.417
Uno de mis mayores héroes murió ayer.

In memoriam Gabriel García Márquez.


15 hours ago // 5 notes
Language night!

Yesterday evening, I went to a meeting for language enthusiasts at a bar in my town. It was great fun! There were eleven people there: three language teachers (two taught English, one Dutch), a Japanese guy who had married a Dutchman and was learning Dutch, three Chinese students of the Dutch teacher, another Dutch guy who was still in high school and was also learning Spanish, two people who spent the evening practising their Russian (and who I didn’t realy get the chance to talk to) and me. 

I traded book recommendations with the Japanese guy, practised my Spanish with the Dutch guy, and talked with the Chinese students for a really long time. One of them, a girl from Sichuan, also really likes cooking, so we’re probably gonna make Hot Pot together sometime. :)

So I made some new friends! I really hope we can meet up again next week.


18 hours ago // 5 notes
maskedlinguist:

mapsontheweb:

Proportion of respondents who said they could speak Irish in the Ireland census 2011 and the Northern Ireland census 2011

I had a friend whose parents sent him to an Irish language school pretty much until whatever the High School age is over there. His parents don’t really speak it, but he and most of his siblings speak it natively.  What was hilarious is that he’d get asked to help with the parish’s Irish Mass, and he’s totally atheist - he’d still help, he just found it amusing.

So is the situation of the Irish language getting better?

I think the UK was pretty dumb not to include Wales in the Union Flag

I mean, they could’ve had a bloody DRAGON on their flag

Then again, I’m pretty sure how that decision went:

'Hmm yes, dragons are pretty cool, but that would involve acknowledging the existence of Wales, so…'


1 day ago // 4 notes
fleurdulys:

The Wagon Tracks - Joan Miro
1918
nadrianfl:

33- Añoranzas  #MarioBenedetti
Dutch question

science-of-noise:

jespru:

science-of-noise:

I made a post about wugs.  One of the languages I used was Dutch, which I admittedly don’t really know much about.  I took an educated guess based on oog/ogen that the Dutch plural of wug would be wugen.  A few rebloggers said this is wrong, and it would be either wuggen or wugs.

Fair enough, I believe y’all, I just want to know more.

If it’s wuggen, is that to preserve the hard /g/ at the end, so that it isn’t pronounced /ʋʏxən/?

If its wugs, is it typical in Dutch to take loanwords in the singular and plural from the source language?

And which is better?

'Wuggen' would be to prevent the 'u' from lengthening into the sound Dutch spells as 'uu' (I'm sorry, I'm not very good at phonology and IPA). 'Wugen' might be the plural of a word 'wuug', then. And yes, we do tend to prefer '-s' for loanwords, although there's no hard rule there.

Thanks!  So is there a vowel lengthening rule in VCV sequences as there is in English (like “club” —> “clubbed” and not “clubed”)?

And I think the “uu” sound would be /y:/ in IPA.

Yeah, that sounds about right :)


2 days ago // 7 notes
Dutch question

science-of-noise:

I made a post about wugs.  One of the languages I used was Dutch, which I admittedly don’t really know much about.  I took an educated guess based on oog/ogen that the Dutch plural of wug would be wugen.  A few rebloggers said this is wrong, and it would be either wuggen or wugs.

Fair enough, I believe y’all, I just want to know more.

If it’s wuggen, is that to preserve the hard /g/ at the end, so that it isn’t pronounced /ʋʏxən/?

If its wugs, is it typical in Dutch to take loanwords in the singular and plural from the source language?

And which is better?

'Wuggen' would be to prevent the 'u' from lengthening into the sound Dutch spells as 'uu' (I'm sorry, I'm not very good at phonology and IPA). 'Wugen' might be the plural of a word 'wuug', then. And yes, we do tend to prefer '-s' for loanwords, although there's no hard rule there.

(via ubungmachtdenmeister)


2 days ago // 7 notes